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Full-time Faculty

Caroline Gee, Ph.D. View profile information for Staff Member Send email to Staff Member web page
Chair
Office BGS 307
(949) 582-4595

Anne Cox View profile information for Staff Member Send email to Staff Member web page
Office BGS 207
(949) 582-4388

Damm, Kathryn, Ph.D. View profile information for Staff Member Send email to Staff Member web page
Office BGS 208
(949) 582-4816

Kris Leppien-Christensen, Ph.D.
View profile information for Staff Member Send email to Staff Member web page
Office BGS 321
(949) 582-4827

Amira Wegenek, Ph.D. View profile information for Staff Member Send email to Staff Member web page
Office BGS 323
(949) 582-4407

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Student Learning Outcomes

Psychology Department
Student Learning Outcomes
Updated 1/30/14

 

Psych 1

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Define the term psychology and demonstrate command of basic vocabulary in psychology.
2. Identify the differences between the science of psychology and pseudoscience, differentiating between anecdotes and information obtained using the scientific method.
3. Differentiate between applied and experimental psychology in relation to different types of psychologists and what they do.
4. Distinguish among the major theoretical perspectives in psychology (behavioral, psychoanalytic, cognitive, physiological, and sociocultural).
5. Describe how psychological data are gathered and evaluated, and where bias may enter the research scheme.
6. Explain how psychological theories are used to describe, understand, predict, and control or modify behavior.
7. Recognize misuses and unethical applications of psychological principles.
8. Evaluate sources of information in psychology using traditional and electronic databases.

 

Psych 2

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Describe the process by which psychologists conduct research and identify where ethnic and gender bias may enter the research process.
2. Complete a literature search using PsycArticles database and the Internet to find information about various topics in psychology that are published in major psychological journals.
3. Analyze and interpret research results and write up experiments in American Psychological Association (APA) format.
4. Evaluate a theoretical model, ask a question related to that model, design and propose an experiment to answer the question asked, describe how the research will be conducted and how the data will be evaluated and interpreted. Based on the data, the student should be able to argue whether the data support or do not support the environmental hypotheses.
5. Compare and contrast the strengths and weaknesses of the following research strategies: true experimental research, naturalistic, observational and correlational research.
6. Demonstrate familiarity with commonly used statistical software (e.g., SPSS, Excel).
7. Identify different sources of bias that may exist within a research study.
8. Recognize the importance of the use of statistical analyses and the reporting of statistics in research reports
9. Demonstrate understanding of the role of ethics in performing research with human and animal participants and differentiate between ethical and unethical research practices.

 

Psych 3

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. Identify the major cells of the nervous system and describe their functions.
2. Define the cortical lobes and major structures of the brain; distinguish their functions and summarize their interrelationships.
3. Distinguish the receptors and brain mechanisms of the sensory systems, their anatomical connections and the role of experience in shaping these systems.
4. Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the major methods of measuring brain activity
5. Identify the functional central and/or peripheral pathways involved in sleep and wakefulness, food intake, reproductive behaviors, memory formation and/or emotional behaviors.
6. Identify the underlying causes of neurological and mental disorders.
7. Demonstrate an understanding of brain development and the concept of neural plasticity
8. Describe the ventricular system in the brain and explain production, flow, and reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid in relation to types of hydrocephalus.
9. Evaluate some of the ethical issues that arise in the field of biological psychology (such as the use of animal research, criteria for psychosurgery).

 

Psych 4

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical basis of how cognitive psychology was formed as a branch of general psychology.

  2. Distinguish the major theoretical objectives of cognitive psychology from that of other subdisciplines in the field of psychology.

  3. Identify and describe the goals of the subareas of study within cognitive psychology.

  4. Critically evaluate sources of information in the field of cognitive psychology.

  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the research processes that have culminated in past and current knowledge in the field of cognitive psychology.

Psych 5

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Describe the complex psychological, sociological, cultural, and biological influences on human sexuality.
2. Integrate the interaction of the biological bases of human sexuality with the psychological and historical influences in our society.
3. Trace the development of human sexuality from childhood to old age.
4. Compare the variations in sexuality found across social classes, ethnic groups, and other species.
5. Demonstrate a command of basic vocabulary in human sexuality.

 

Psych 7

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Define and provide examples of the major developmental issues of nature vs. nurture, continuity vs. discontinuity, stability vs. change, universality vs. context specificity
2. Compare and contrast various theoretical frameworks of developmental psychology.
3. Differentiate between the various methods of investigation used in developmental studies.
4. Describe the processes of heredity, human reproduction, and prenatal development.
5. Identify major developmental milestones for children from conception through adolescence in the areas of social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development.
6. Evaluate the influence of biological, maturational, and environmental factors affecting the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children from conception through adolescence.
7. Analyze how, social, economic, political, historical and cultural contexts affect children's development.

Psych 16

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify the ways in which culture, ethnicity, race, gender and sex have been used to explain diversity among groups and populations in the U.S. and the world.

  2. Explain the psychological influences of culture on basic psychological processes, social and human development, social cognition, and social interaction.

  3. Analyze contemporary theories of psychology relative to culture

  4. Critically evaluate scientific literature examining culture, ethnic, sex, and gender differences on psychological factors.

  5. Describe and apply skills that enhance cross-cultural communication, interactions, and relationships.

  6. Demonstrate an awareness of their own and others’ culture and worldviews.

Psych 30

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Identify the interactive effects of psychology and sociology on behavior
2. Describe the actual, imagined or implied presence of others' effects on behavior
3. Analyze the specific social-psychological phenomena by applying appropriate major theoretical models
4. Explain both general and specific perceptual characteristics that impact behavior
5. Identify how the processes of social perception influence how we perceive ourselves, other individuals and other groups in society
6. Discuss the concepts of conformity, obedience, attitude formation, persuasion, and group processes
7. Evaluate current issues and controversies in the field of social psychology

 

 

Psych 21

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Analyze the process by which psychologists conduct research and identify where gender bias
    may enter the research process.

  2. Identify the biological determinants of gender, and evaluate their relative conributions to gender identity in comparison to the role of psycho-social factors.

  3. Discuss recent research on mood changes over the menstrual cycle and during the postpartum
    period, and assess the relative roles of hormones and culture in relation to these changes.

  4. Identify the treatment of the genders by the media, in advertisements and in language.

  5. Compare and contrast the similarities among the following types of victimization: rape, battering, sexual harassment and incest; propose solutions to these problems.

  6. Compare and contrast theories of how gender identity develops.

Psych 33

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Analyze and explain the major theories of personality.

  2. Analyze and explain the major theories of human motivation.

  3. Apply principles of adjustment to major life transitions.

  4. Critique approaches to adjustment.

  5. Recognize and define problems associated with intimacy and human relationships.

 

Psych 37

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. List and describe the five axes of diagnosis used in the most current edition of this diagnostic manual.
2. Compare and contrast biological, psychological, family and social views of the causes and methods of treatment of abnormal behaviors.
3. Identify and compare major scientific methods for gathering and analyzing information for explaining behavior.
4. List and/or recognize the characteristics of specific anxiety, somatoform, mood, eating, sleep, sexual-identity, substance abuse, personality, schizophrenic and cognitive disorders.
5. Identify the differences between organic and functional disorders.
6. Recognize unethical therapeutic practices according to American Psychological Association guidelines.

 

Psych 44

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Formulate and identify null and alternative hypotheses in research.

  2. Define and give examples of independent variables, dependent variables, and scales of measurement.

  3. Generate and interpret various types of graphical displays and tables from research data.

  4. Differentiate between descriptive and inferential statistics.

  5. Analyze data using statistical software (SPSS).

 

Psych 125

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Distinguish the different types of aging, and what causes these different types of aging.

  2. Understand the theoretical and methodological issues that researchers face in studying older adults.

  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological changes that some older adults in later life experience including depression and anxiety.

  4. Demonstrate understanding of the cognitive functioning and intelligence of older adults.

  5. Know the different physiological changes, and the current top causes of death.

  6. Apply the social issues that older adults are currently facing and how these will affect their overall well-being.

  7. Understand the different types of stressors that older adults face, and how older adults cope with these stressors.

  8. Demonstrate knowledge of what happens during retirement and the living arrangement options that older adults have after retirement

  9. Be proficient in understanding the different social support theories and how relationships change in later life

 

Psych 140:

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify common misconceptions about the field of psychology.

  2. Differentiate among different major programs within the field of psychology.

  3. Identify the goals of psychology as a science.

  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the skills necessary for success as a psychology major.

  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements for admittance to different graduate programs related to psychology.

  6. Differentiate between popular media articles in psychology and articles published in scholarly psychological journals.

  7. Locate resource materials relevant to psychology using the library digital database (e.g., PsycArticles).

  8. Explain the importance of different kinds of volunteer work in preparation for careers and/or graduate school in fields related to psychology.

  9. Identify attainable careers and common work settings for graduates holding a BA/BS in psychology and identify at least two of personal interest to self.

Additionally, Psych 1, Psych 2, and Psych 7 meet the Information Competency General Education requirement and is an institutional student learning outcome (ISLO).

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