Are you taking, or thinking about taking, Anatomy, Physiology or Microbiology? You're in the right place!

THESE ARE THE CHANGES YOU NEED TO KNOW

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Prerequisites

    In an effort to promote improved student learning and success, we have prerequisites for each of these classes. 

 

    Bio 11 Human Anatomy

        You must pass Bio 20 (Introduction to Biology), or the equivalent, before taking Bio 11

            (exception: 1 year of High School Biology with grade of "C" or better)

 

    Bio 15 General Microbiology

            You must pass Bio 20 and Chem 108 (Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry), or the equivalent, before taking Bio 15            

            prerequisite exception for the Chem 108 course: 1 year of High School Chemistry with grade of "C" or better

            NOTE: We will accept a one semester general chemistry course as equivalent to CHEM 108. However, we do not accept a passing grade on the Chemistry challenge exam.

 

    Bio 12 Human Physiology

        You must pass Bio 11 and Chem 108 (Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry), or the equivalent, before taking Bio 12            

            prerequisite exception for the Chem 108 course: 1 year of High School Chemistry with grade of "C" or better

            NOTE: We will accept a one semester general chemistry course as equivalent to CHEM 108. However, we do not accept a passing grade on the Chemistry challenge exam.

 

NOTES:

1.  If you are going to use a high school course or a course from another college to complete the prerequisites, you must complete the Saddleback College Prerequisite Evaluation Form. You may download the form here.  When you have completed the form, please submit it, with supporting documents (transcripts, etc...) to the Math, Science and Engineering Division office in SM 336.

 

2. With all prerequisite courses, an equivalent course taken at another college will satisfy the requirement.  We will accept most one-semester college level chemistry courses or one-semester college level biology courses.  Please see note 1 above for the appropriate request form.

 

Suggested Course Sequence

 

    We do not recommend that students take more than one of the nursing prerequisites ( Bio 11, Bio 15, Bio 12) at the same time. These are academically challenging and time consuming courses that require a tremendous amount of work outside of classroom hours.  To get the most out of these courses, and probably achieve the best grades, we recommend the following sequence:

 

    Semester One

        Biology 20, Introduction to Biology and Chem 108, Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry

 

    Semester Two

        Biology 11, Human Anatomy (and Chem 108, Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry,

        if you skipped it last semester)

 

    Semester Three

        Biology 15, General Microbiology

 

    Semester Four

        Biology 12, Human Physiology

 

    Here's a slightly faster track for extremely strong students only. Be advised that it is much more difficult and you may not be able to achieve the grades you are hoping to acheive. If you utilize summer sessions, this can be completed in a single calendar year:

 

    Semester One

        Biology 20, Introduction to Biology and Chem 108, Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry

 

    Semester Two

        Biology 11, Human Anatomy and Biology 15, General Microbiology

 

    Semester Three

        Biology 12, Human Physiology

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Q: Why are there prerequisites for these course?

 

A: Anatomy, Microbiology and Physiology are rigorous classes designed to prepare students for careers or majors in the health sciences. Without a strong foundation in the basic sciences of biology and chemistry, many students struggle and are unsuccessful in Bio 11, Bio 15, Bio 12. The prerequisites are designed to ensure that students have sufficient background in basic sciences, so that they will be successful in our courses and their future health science careers.

 

 

Q: Why is Biology 20 (Introduction to Biology) a prerequisite for Biology 11 (Human Anatomy) and Bio 15 (General Microbiology)?

 

A: Anatomy and Microbiology instructors assume that their students have a good understanding of basic cell biology, metabolism and genetics. With regard to cell biology, students need to be knowledgeable and comfortable with the structure and function of all cellular organelles and membranes, as well as the mechanisms involved in cell division. For metabolism, students should understand the metabolic pathways involved in how cells capture and transform energy in molecules such as glucose and ATP. For genetics, students need to have a good grasp of how information contained in DNA is organized in chromosomes, and how that information is replicated, transcribed into mRNA and finally translated into proteins. Biology 20 covers these topics and lays the foundation for learning the more advanced and detailed topics covered in Anatomy and Microbiology. Additionally, Biology 20 provides a survey of the huge diversity of living organisms on earth, from animals to plants to microorganisms, and discusses how these species interact and evolve. Understanding this "big picture" view of life on earth greatly enhances student understanding of the smallest details of life covered in Anatomy and Microbiology.

 

 

Q: Why is Chemistry 108 (Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry) a prerequisite for Biology 12 (Human Physiology)?

 

A: Physiology is essentially a study of the functional chemistry of the human body. Physiology instructors need their students to have a strong foundation in basic chemical principles in order to understand the complexities of the nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, digestive and renal systems. Chem 108 is a one-semester introductory biochemistry course that has been developed specifically to help students in the health sciences succeed. The course has no prerequisites, assumes students have never taken a chemistry course before, and starts from the very beginning. Topics include: basic element characteristics, chemical bonding, reactions, reversibility, enzyme structure and function, acid/base interactions, PKa, Henderson-Hasselbach equation, gas laws, partial pressures, gene expression, oxidation/reduction reactions and metabolism. Chem 108 students learn these important chemical principles so that they can apply them to complex interactions and problems in Physiology. The bottom line is: students who have taken Chem 108 have greater success (higher grades) in Physiology.

Q: Why is Chemistry 108 (Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry) a prerequisite for Biology 15 (Microbiology)?

A: Microbiology is the study of small living organisms including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and worms. Students in microbiology learn about the metabolism of these organisms and how they are affected by the chemical nature of their specific environments.  They identify bacteria based on biochemical pathways, and they learn how antimicrobial drugs and disinfectants work on a molecular level.   Chem 108 provides the foundation necessary to understand and apply these fundamental concepts in microbiology.

Q: Why is the suggested order of courses first Anatomy, then Microbiology, and finally, Physiology?

 

A: The classes were designed to build on each other. Information learned in Anatomy helps students in Microbiology. In turn, topics covered in Microbiology pave the way for success in Physiology. For most students, Anatomy is the easiest of the three courses, followed by Microbiology (harder), and Physiology (hardest). The majority of our students are better at memorization than with critical thinking and conceptual material. Although Anatomy contains some conceptual material, it entails the most memorization of the three classes. Microbiology is about 50-50 memorization and conceptual material, and Physiology is mostly conceptual and critical thinking. Over the years, thousands of students have told us that Physiology is the hardest class they have ever taken, so itís best to save it for last when youíve honed your study skills to perfection and have a solid foundation in Anatomy, Microbiology, and Chemistry.

 

 

Q: Can I take the prerequisite classes (Biology 20 and Chemistry 108) for credit/no credit instead of for a letter grade?

 

A: Yes, earning a credit grade in these prerequisite classes would allow you to enroll in Biology 11, Biology 15 and Biology 12 at Saddleback. Always check with the specific clinical program (nursing, dental hygiene, physicians assistant, etc) you wish to apply to for their particular policies and enrollment requirements, however.

 

 

Q: What are the Biology discussion sections for Human Anatomy and Human Physiology?

 

A: These instructor-lead discussion sections are designed to allow students to explore course topics with further background, problem solving and group discussion. Students enrolled in the Biology 113 and Biology 120 courses will earn units and gain a greater understanding of the course material. The objective in offering the Special Topics discussions is to increase student retention and understanding of complex material in Bio 11 and Bio 12.

 

Course Waitlists

    Waitlists will become available for Bio 11, Bio 15 and Bio 12 once these courses become filled. Most (but not all) instructors use waitlists to add students to their classes on the first day. If you are on the waitlist, you will not be automatically added to the class.  Instructors are not required to add students in the order of the waitlist on the first day, though many of them do.  If someone drops the class before the semester begins, and you are next on the waitlist, you will be notified by email.  You will have only 24 hours to add the class, or you will give up your spot as the offer is given to the next student on the list.  Keep an eye on your email once you get on the waitlist!  And be sure to show up for class on time the first day, so the instructor knows you are a serious student.  More information on waitlists can be found here:  http://www.socccd.edu/help/waitlist.htm

 

For More Information

If you need more information or have specific questions, please feel free to contact any of the following faculty

Mareclo Pires Professor of Biology and Co-Chair of Biology Teaches Biology 12
Karah Street Professor of Biology Teaches Biology 12 and Biology 11
Elizabeth Ininns Professor of Biology Teaches Biology 11 and Biology 15
Terry Lopez Assistant Professor of Biology Teaches Biology 15
Kat Shaw Assistant Professor of Biology Teaches Biology 12
Bruno Passarelli Professor of Biology Teaches Biology 11
Monica Freidrich Professor of Biology Teaches BIO 15 and BIO 3C
Jim Zoval Professor of Chemistry Teaches Chemistry 108